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Vintage Brick Salvage: Reclaimed Bricks | Green-Buildings.com

January 29, 2012

Vintage Brick Salvage, a company based in Rockford, Illinois, purchases reclaimed bricks from demolition contractors, mostly from the Midwest and Eastern half of the United States. Vintage Brick Salvage resells these salavaged bricks as thin brick, common brick, and paving brick.

Types of Salvaged Brick

Vintage Brick Salvage sells three types of reclaimed brick products:

• Thin Brick: Thin brick is sliced from salvaged bricks and used as tile. Thin brick tiles can be used for walls, floors and walks.

• Common Brick: This is the most common form of fired brick. Vintage Brick Salvage sells a selection of these bricks for reuse, including Old Chicago commons in pink and buff, Milwaukee cream city brick, Indiana and Carolina adobe brick, and St. Louis red brick.

• Paving Brick: These bricks are used for paving streets and sidewalks. Vintage Brick Salvage’s offerings for paving bricks are constantly changing – but they currently offer cobblestone and Purington pavers.

LEED Credit Overview

Reclaimed brick and brick tile can contribute to LEED in the Materials and Resources (MR) credit category. According to LEED for New Construction, reclaimed bricks can contribute to the following credit:

• MR Credit 3: Materials Reuse (1-2 points): This credit awards 1 point for using 5% reused materials on the project, and 2 points for 10% reused materials.

It is also possible that the reclaimed bricks can contribute toward MR Credit 5: Regional Materials (1-2 points). This credit requires that the building material is recovered and manufactured within 500 miles of the project site. Since many of the bricks are reclaimed and manufactured in the Midwest, the reclaimed bricks may qualify for this credit. Check with Vintage Brick Salvage to identify the source and manufacturing location for the bricks to see if they would qualify for this credit.

via Vintage Brick Salvage: Reclaimed Bricks | Green-Buildings.com.

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